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Mixie: Mixtures of substances in the workplace: computer-based tool for evaluating the chemical risk (Calculation of the Rm)

Utility 

MixieExposure to mixtures of chemical substances in the workplace raises questions. Organizations such as the ACGIH® in its Chemical Substance TLV® Committee and much legislation make the recommendation that the presence of all the contaminants that have similar effects on the same organs or systems of the human body be taken into account. In this case, it is recommended that the exposures be added rather than considered individually... unless it is established otherwise... the interactions must then be taken into account (synergy, potentiation, antagonism...).

The computer-based tool that you are preparing to use integrates the results of a research project on toxicological interactions. The project was carried out in 2 phases and the reports are available on the IRSST’s Web site : ( Phase 1 et Phase 2 ).

Disclaimer
This computer-based tool is an aid in decision-making made available to occupational health professionals. It informs them about the additivity or interaction potential between chemical substances in a mixture found in the workplace. It cannot replace the informed judgement of an occupational health professional.

Adolf Vyskocil and Daniel Drolet
Access to the tool : (see installation note below )
Two versions of the tool are available.
Team
Project leaders
  • Adolf Vyskocil, Département de santé environnementale et de santé au travail, Université de Montréal
  • Daniel Drolet, Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec
Software development
  • François Lemay, Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec
Collaborators
  • Claude Viau, Département de santé environnementale et de santé au travail, Université de Montréal
  • Gilles Lapointe, Service du répertoire toxicologique, Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail du Québec
  • Robert Tardif, Département de santé environnementale et de santé au travail, Université de Montréal
  • Ginette Truchon, Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec
  • France Gagnon, Département de santé environnementale et de santé au travail, Université de Montréal
  • Normand Gagnon, Service du répertoire toxicologique, Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail du Québec
  • Marc Baril, Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec
  • Denis Bégin, Département de santé environnementale et de santé au travail, Université de Montréal
  • Michel Gérin, Département de santé environnementale et de santé au travail, Université de Montréal
Application of the Regulation respecting occupational health and safety (RROHS) in Quebec
Contrary to the utility for the adjustment of PEVs of the RROHS in relation to unusual work schedules, the use of this utility is not mandatory for applying the RROHS.

Part 3 of Schedule 1 of the RROHS mentions that ...
«Where two or more substances… are present at the work location and where they have similar effects on the same organs of the human body, the effects of these substances are considered to be additive, unless it is established otherwise.»

This provision applies only for TWAEV (time-weighted average exposure values) and not for short-term exposure values (STEV) or ceiling values (CV).

The Java version and the Javascript version both require the use of a recent browser.

The Javascript version should operate properly as soon as Javascript is permitted at the computer workstation from which the utility is invoked.

This requirement also applies to the Java version which, essentially a Java applet, requires as well the prior installation of "Java Runtime Environment (JRE)" available from Sun at http://java.sun.com/products/plugin/.

The Java version allows up to 12 substances to be chosen, while the Javascript version is limited to 8 substances.

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